The State of Drone Regulations: How to Build a Real Estate Marketing Business that Includes Drones

BY Zacc Dukowitz
29 June 2017

Last week we co-hosted a record breaking webinar with Real Tour Vision on the state of drone regulations and real estate marketing. We had over 600 people sign up and about 300 attend, indicating a huge amount of interest in drone regulations and in learning more about how to grow a real estate marketing business that includes drone services.

In case you missed the webinar, you can watch a recording here.

real-estate-marketing

Image source

Leading up to the webinar we wrote about the last year in drone regulations, and what we can expect to see in the future.

This final article in our three part series will answer questions that came up during the webinar. Many of you asked about what it takes to build a real estate marketing business that includes drone services, from marketing to pricing to building out the skill sets required, so that is the focus for this post.

Since Jay Stringham and Jason LaVenture of Real Tour Vision are the experts when it comes to real estate marketing, we’re going to let them take away.

Check out this awesome, in-depth video Jason shot to answer all of your questions (I’ve listed out the highlights below the video, with links so you can skip to the sections of most interest to you):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpPH3_j-Plc&feature=youtu.be

Skip around in the video to find answers to your questions

Even More Pricing Advice

Jay Stringham also wrote up some advice to address pricing, which lays out a concrete process you can follow for deciding how much to charge per job.

We’d recommend paying close attention to the last sentence in what Jay wrote—sometimes less work can lead to more money if you’re confident in your worth, and decide not to haggle with those who don’t want to pay for quality work.

Here’s Jay’s advice:

First you want to figure out what your costs of doing business are, including reasonable gear purchases, marketing budget, etc. That can be done weekly or monthly, but in the end you will want to multiply it out so you have a ball park on the year. Then you want to come up with a reasonable idea of what you would like to make in a year. Add those two numbers together.

Determine how many days you can realistically work in a given week. Divide the total of expenses plus preferred salary by the number of days you want to work in a year, taking into consideration holidays, vacations etc.. 

That will determine how much you will need to make on a daily basis. Then you will want to take the amount of daily income you will require to meet your expenses and salary and divide by a realistic number of jobs you can complete in a given day. You will now have an idea of what you will need to charge per shoot to meet your needs.

You will want to determine if that number is realistic given the market, and adjust expenses and salary accordingly. There will inevitably be people who will want to try to talk you down in price, but you will have a very reasonable argument to present to them on why you charge what you do, and convince them that the service you are offering is worth it.

Be aware of what your competition is charging and what their quality is, so you can present facts to as to why a potential client should hire you over your competition. At the end of the day, the potential clients who refuse to pay reasonable prices are often the most difficult to work with. You may find yourself in a situation where you are able to make the same amount of money or more doing less work and dealing with less hassles by eliminating clients who try to lowball your services.

Still have unanswered questions? Check out these five essential tips for marketing a drone business, or email us directly at support[at]uavcoach[dot]com.

Zacc Dukowitz

Contributing Writer

Zacc Dukowitz is a contributing writer, and the former Director of Marketing for UAV Coach. A writer with professional experience in education technology and digital marketing, Zacc is passionate about reporting on the drone industry at a time when UAVs can help us live better lives. Zacc also holds the rank of nidan in Aikido, a Japanese martial art, and is a widely published fiction writer. Zacc has an MFA from the University of Florida and a BA from St. John's College. Follow @zaccdukowitz or check out zaccdukowitz.com to read his work.

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