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Become an FAA-Certified Drone Pilot to Fly for Commercial Use

Drone Pilot Ground School is our flagship FAA Part 107 test prep and training course. Join over 35,000 people who have signed up and pass your FAA drone exam on your first try — or your money back.

The Part 107 drone license is required by the FAA for all non-recreational flights:

    • Flying a drone for hire
    • Flying a drone on behalf of your organization
    • Flying a drone for a public safety department or other government entity

35,000+ Trained — Solo Pilots to Enterprise Teams

How it Works


Step 1

STUDY ONLINE

Most of our students spend 15-20 hours over 2-3 weeks going through our online self-paced lessons and practice tests.

Step 2

PASS THE FAA EXAM

You'll get 2 hours to take a 60-question, multiple-choice test at your local test center, and you'll find out right there if you pass or fail.

Step 3

get your FAA LICENSE

After passing your test, complete a quick online application and start flying with your temporary certificate within 5-7 days. Your hard copy certificate will arrive in 6-8 weeks.

WHAT YOU GET FROM THE #1 FAA DRONE TEST PREP COURSE

Frequently Asked

Questions

Do I need a drone license if I'm just flying for fun?

In the U.S., if you are flying a drone just for fun, you need to go through a free online training that takes about 30 minutes. Here’s more info on the FAA’s TRUST training.

Does my drone license need to be renewed?

Yes, to maintain your FAA Remote Pilot Certificate, you’ll need to go through a recurrent knowledge training every two years. This training is free and can be done from home.

How long does it take to get a drone license?

Most students use our self-paced course to study for about 15-20 hours over a couple of weeks. After passing the FAA exam, you’ll receive a temporary certificate within a few business days and your official certificate card in the mail 6-8 weeks later.

What's on the FAA drone certification exam?

The FAA’s drone exam has 60-multiple choice questions. There are over 120 concepts that the FAA can test you on in areas like FAA drone laws, weather & micrometeorology, emergency procedures, radio communications, and more.

How do I find my local FAA test center?

There are about 800 locations in the U.S. states and territories. Click here to find your local FAA drone testing center. You can search by zip code.

How old must I be to take this test?

You must be at least 16 years old.

Do I need to be a U.S. citizen?

You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get your FAA drone license.

Do I need to own or know how to fly a drone?

Interestingly enough, no. The FAA does not require that you demonstrate drone flight proficiency in order to get your drone license. If you or your team would benefit from in-person instruction, we offer hands-on drone flight training classes with experienced instructors.

How much does it cost to get a drone license?

The total cost of getting your drone license is relatively low — less than $500. The FAA test fee is $175. Then there’s your test preparation costs, and an additional $5 fee to register your drone.

What kind of drone jobs are available?

Drones are being used in a growing number of industries, from real estate and construction to insurance and infrastructure inspections. We highlight industries and specific opportunities where drone pilots can find jobs in our UAV Coach Drone Jobs Guide.

How much money can a certified drone pilot make?

Drones are used in so many industries with varying degrees of client outputs needed. What you can expect to make depends on whether or not you’re taking basic photos, helping to analyze more complex aerial data sets, doing technical inspection work with a thermal camera, able to work on a film set, etc. In this YouTube video, we go into more detail about how much drone pilots make, and how to get your own paying clients.

Do I need to buy drone insurance?

Insurance may not always be legally required, but if you’re flying a drone for any kind of non-recreational use, we’d recommend buying some. In our drone insurance guide, we break down the differences between liability and hull insurance and go over specific pricing.

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