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Drone Laws in Peru

Drone regulations and links for people flying drones in Peru.

drone laws in PeruPeru Drone Regulations

According to Peru’s national aviation authority, Peru’s General Directore of Civil Aeronautics (DGAC), flying a drone is legal in Peru, but we recommend being aware of and compliant with the drone regulations listed below before doing so.

Special Travel Considerations

If you’re traveling to Peru and want to bring your drone, the DGAC lists these special considerations for foreigners who want to fly drones:

  • If flying commercially, you’ll need to obtain a certificate. That process is outline in the final section of this page.
  • On entering Peru you must declare your UAV(s) on your customs form, and pay a VAT or tax based on the value of your drone (usually about 18%). You will be given a receipt which will allow you to get the VAT refunded upon exiting the country. If you fail to declare your drone at customs, there may be a fine of $250 USD.

If you’d like to contact the DGAC directly before you travel with any questions you might have, here is their contact information: atencionalciudadano@mtc.gob.pe / + 51 1 615 7800

flying a drone in Peru

Why fly a drone in Peru? To get great aerial shots like these!

General Rules for Flying a Drone in Peru

Based on our research and interpretation of the laws, here are the most important rules to know for flying a drone in Peru.

  • Do not let your drone fly beyond your line of sight.
  • Do not fly more than 1 continuous hour.
  • Do not fly at night or in bad weather conditions without clear visibility.
  • Do not fly higher than 500 feet.
  • Maintain a distance of at least 30 meters (98 feet) horizontally and 20 meters (65 feet) vertically from any obstacle such as persons, objects, or buildings.
  • Do not fly over people or large crowds.
  • Do not fly within 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) of airports.
  • Do not fly within 30 meters (98 feet) of any road infrastructure.
  • Do not fly at speeds faster than 160 kph (100 mph).
  • The done cannot throw or drop and objects without specific authorization by the DGAC.

*Notes: Drones may not be flown in Machu Picchu or any historical sites unless you secure an additional permit that allows you to fly your drone at a specific historical site.

For more information on Peru’s drone laws, see this document created by the DGAC.

Know something we don’t about drone laws in Peru? Send us an email at support@uavcoach.com. We are not international aviation attorneys and do our best to keep this page up-to-date for drone pilots, but the reality is that given the pace of the small unmanned aerial system (sUAS) industry and how governments are responding, drone regulations in Peru can change throughout the year, and those changes can be hard to track. If we missed something, please reach out to let us know.

Registration and Certification Requirements for Flying a Drone in Peru

Registration

All drones must be registered with the DGAC. To register your drone, you must submit an application with your personal information and the drone’s technical information, including:

  • Make and model
  • Country of manufacture
  • Serial number
  • Type and number of engines
  • Frequency of control
  • Maximum take-off weight
  • Description of incorporated equipment
  • Photography of the drone
  • Copy of the current registration or validity certificate

After submitting the application, if approved you will be granted a registration card that should be kept with you at all times.

Certification

For commercial use you must obtain a certification of pilot accreditation. Here are the required steps:

  • Make your request by completing the form at Appendix B found on this webpage, and attach a passport-size color photo.
  • Schedule an exam by telephone at + 51 1 615 7800 ext. 1670 or on this webpage.

The application process may take up to 60 business days. For additional information, email rpas-dgac@mtc.gob.pe or call +51 1 615 7800 ext. 1523 and 1156.

Want to get a feel for the kind of footage you could get flying a drone in Peru? Here you go: